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Leadership development

Mid Level Leader

Helping director leaders at global and fast-growing software organization take a more holistic view to strategic thinking, decision making, risk taking and leadership with partners and team members.

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The Uncommon sense of MESSY leadership

Based on research from interviews with 40+ top global leadership learning experts, this whitepaper outlines how 2020 changed the mindsets leaders need for success.

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Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

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Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

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BTS and Beiersdorf DEI Partnership

We’re collaborating with Beiersdorf on upskilling their workforce to foster inclusivity, agility, and continuous improvement. With a focus on creating an environment where all voices are heard and valued, DEI program empowers leaders to make intentional, inclusive decisions, paving the way for cultural transformation.

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How to Reimagine Strategy Planning to Embrace the Unpredictable

If the pandemic and the ensuing few years have taught us nothing else, it is the fact that we are in a world of terminal turmoil. Change comes fast and often. Black swans lurk around every corner. Yet many companies are still executing their strategic planning like it’s 1985. The new unpredictable normal calls for a different approach.  Historically, strategy creation was a long, linear process with a singular plan to win. This method worked well when product lifecycles were lengthy and technology-fueled disruptions were infrequent. The challenge with that now is that when conditions change—and they inevitably will—an organization wed to a singular plan is left paralyzed without an alternative. Or they overcompensate by trying many different things, reacting in the moment. On either extreme, a few things happen that rapidly derail growth and progress.   Some companies march toward their long-term plan ignoring signals that it’s time to shift—like lemmings off a cliff, they are unable to save themselves. Polaroid, Blockbuster, and Blackberry are unfortunate examples.   Then there are the companies that adopt a rapid reactive mode, trying to quickly pivot, without a future-focused view as their North Star. These organizations suffer from shiny ball syndrome, chasing something new with every market signal. They can’t gain any solid ground and they exhaust themselves in the process.   Walking the line requires “both/and” leadership: 3 ways to make it real  The middle and most optimal course is to hold on to the tension of creating energy and excitement in setting a compelling long-term vision while also working with all the teams to figure out how to realize that goal. The “how” is the hard task and will require leaders—and their teams—to do their best thinking and most challenging work.   Here is what to do differently to bring those two tensions together.  1. Deliberately broaden your approach and strategic aperture. When thinking through strategy, the best organizations look beyond the common or expected path, seeking not just to rely on a given Total Addressable Market or on packaged industry trends created by an in-house strategy team. To be sure, market size is important, but deliberately embracing strategy development in a different way can help teams break the common pattern of merely extrapolating current trends into the future. The best ideas and new perspectives truly come from everywhere, so engaging leaders (and the organization more broadly) to think bigger can help people break out of their current rivers of thinking, allowing them to view the business of today and the potential business of the future in fundamentally different ways.  2. Create discrete possibilities to focus thinking. With a wide runway for strategy creation, people (and leaders) can easily produce a list of strategic alternatives a mile long, to a point that they become quickly overwhelmed. This result is driven by the same logic that makes someone lose their way in the cereal aisle, paralyzed by having so many choices. After starting with a wide approach to explore strategic possibilities outside of a given industry or against known competitors, the best organizations then intentionally narrow the list to frame a few discrete and mutually exclusive options for the leadership team to consider. Evaluating a few potential options allows leaders to better access longer-term strategic thinking. Take, for example, the experience of a fast-growing founder-led software company that had just gone public. Shortly after their IPO, the senior managers told Wall Street they would reach $1 billion in revenue in three years. Unfortunately, there was internal disagreement over which direction to take to achieve that target, creating unrest and confusion throughout the organization. We started by helping the senior managers gain clarity about which approaches to pursue and to define three mutually exclusive strategic plans. We then helped the executive team to better understand current state realities, to determine potential risks, and to solidify the ideal execution plan. We did that in part by leveraging the power of a quantitative model of their business to help them see the challenges and opportunities within each of the three strategic options.   1. Extend scenario planning beyond the C-suite. Stress-testing various scenarios and pre-planning responses is a well-honed tactic for traditional strategy development. Much of the power of scenario planning is that it creates space for debate and discussion, and for placing concerns on the table in a productive way. It also builds confidence and a sense of ownership in the planning group tied to the belief that their best thinking has been considered and applied. And it leads to more resilient and adaptive strategy execution. Rather than trying to cascade and communicate a linear plan throughout the company, the most adaptive organizations define the overall direction and use scenario planning to engage employees to work together on a solution. Here’s an example.   A company in a highly regulated industry was facing a slew of new carbon regulations being debated in the state legislature. Eager to prepare a response to whatever emerged from the legislature, the executive leadership team looked to their functional and business unit leaders for a deeper understanding of the technical and business implications of the full range of likely outcomes. We helped the functional leaders assess the potential regulatory paths, use scenario planning to explain the implications of each path for the company’s business, and scope out the likely responses of competitors to all of the possible changes. The cross-section of this data was then used to identify no-regret decisions that the company would make for each of the outcomes. The use of scenario planning allowed the functional leaders to suggest a menu of strategic options to the C-suite—and then provide the opportunity to continue down the various paths and “experience” the technical and business problems they would likely encounter. Overall, the approach exposed the functional leaders to the core strategic trade-offs of each decision and created a strong sense of ownership of the problem.   The fact is that while the world is no longer predictable, companies still approach developing their strategies as if markets are consistent and reliable. This is one of the 3 biggest reasons why companies fail to execute on great strategies (check out this white paper to find out more about the other two.) Actionable strategy is about engaging the organization in an integrated process of defining the future state, making that future believable and real to the touch, enabling people to change to make the organization ready for its changes, and creating the environment to assess and pivot along the way. Our work and research have shown that people can and will change—happily—and it’s our role as leaders to provide the conditions for their success. Start by embracing the unpredictable and make strategy development your organization’s super power.  You’ll be well on your way to making your strategy actionable. 

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The Art and Science of Business Simulations: A Catalyst for Effective Leadership

Business simulations are a powerful, yet often overlooked tool in the world of leadership development. In this comprehensive guide, we'll explore the framework behind business simulations and uncover their potential for shaping dynamic leaders. Business simulations: Powering excellence through practice Imagine a training method that combines the complexity of real-world business with the safety net of a virtual environment; such is the power of business simulations. Simulations provide an immersive experience, enabling leaders to experiment with potential strategies and decisions, gain insight through doing, and witness the ripple effect of their choices—all without the risk of consequence on the organization’s bottom line. What is a Business Simulation? Business simulations are complex algorithms applied to replicate real business scenarios for leaders and teams. They incorporate key factors such as market dynamics, consumer behavior, and operational intricacies to create the perfect environment for experimentation and innovation. These sophisticated models offer a sandbox where executives are able to test their mettle, apply theories in practical settings, and receive instant feedback on their performance. How to build a successful simulation Executing a business simulation that is both engaging and educational, means meticulously chart the course within the context of your business. This process begins with defining learning objectives and aligning the simulation’s outcomes with the company's strategic goals. Participants are chosen based on their roles and the appropriately related competencies the simulation is designed to develop. Finally, the learning environment must be supportive, ensuring that the experience is comfortable but challenging. Leveraging Business Simulations for leadership development Empirical evidence shows that business simulations are a powerful medium for not just learning, but also for unearthing leadership potential and transforming skills. Key elements of effective Simulation An effective business simulation encompasses these vital elements: Relevance: The simulation must mirror real business challenges, ensuring that lessons are transferable to the workplace. Engagement: It should captivate participants, fostering a collective desire to win and learn simultaneously and together. Feedback: Immediate and clear feedback throughout promotes a continuous learning cycle and encourages iterative improvement. Impact on leadership skills enhancement Business simulations have been particularly effective in honing: Critical Thinking: Participants are forced to analyze and extrapolate from complex data sets, and subsequently learn to make better informed decisions. Adaptability: The dynamic nature of business simulations prompts leaders to pivot and strategize in response to changing circumstances. Ethical Decision-Making: The safe space created by a simulation environment allows leaders to explore the ethical implications of their choices without the usual high stakes and or external consequences. Successful implementation strategies Successful business simulation experiences happen when organizations lay the groundwork and set the right expectations up front, fostering an environment of safety and trust for all participating. Providing follow-up coaching and mentoring post-simulation is also crucial, enabling leaders to integrate their newfound skills into their day-to-day practices. Compelling reasons to integrate Business Simulations into executive training Simulations are also a great tool to test and prepare high potential leaders and raise their game through practice. Elevating strategic thinking Simulations force participants to think strategically, looking beyond immediate tactics to long-term goals and vision. They offer a rarefied platform to dissect and understand the interconnectedness of business elements and how each part contributes to the whole. Sharpening decision making The high-fidelity environment of business simulations forces leaders to make strategic decisions under pressure. In this way, simulation scenarios mirror the urgency and complexity of real-life business, helping leaders mature their decision-making musculature in real time. Nurturing team collaboration Collaboration is the heartbeat of many corporate ventures, and simulations present a unique opportunity to foster this skill. By participating in a shared experience, teams develop synergies, learn to communicate effectively, and crystallize roles within the group. Mastering risk management Risk is ubiquitous in business. Simulations provide a structured approach to risk that equips leaders with the ability to assess, mitigate, and take calculated leaps—essential competencies for effective business management. Increasing financial acumen Business simulations are especially effective methods of deploying financial training. In this variety of simulation, leaders encounter and manage P&L statements, balance sheets, and cash flow. These encounters, contextualized in the reality of their own business, provide learning opportunities deepen participants understanding of organizational financial dynamics. Fostering innovation and creativity Simulations are a practice ground for innovation. Simulations spur creative thinking that is essential for staying ahead in a competitive marketplace, encouraging leaders to experiment with business models and various hypotheses. Providing Real-World Experience The most significant advantage of business simulations as a learning tool, is the real-world experience leaders develop in these risk controlled settings. An immersive learning experience, business simulations effectively bridge the gap between theoretical knowledge and pragmatic application. Business simulations are more than just a training exercise; they are a philosophy that propagates experiential learning. By integrating simulations into executive training, organizations lay the foundation for robust leadership, strategic acumen, and overall business resilience. Simulations challenge participants to embrace the unknowns, traverse complexities, and emerge as sharp, decisive leaders.

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Yumi joins BTS: A new era of empowered, inclusive change

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Leveraging Business Simulations for effective leadership development

In contemporary corporate leadership training, one size certainly does not fit all. Traditional classroom models of executive development are becoming relics in the museum of outdated business practices. Today's business world demands of organizations a new, agile, innovative approach to learning and leadership grooming. Fortunately, at the nexus of technology and educational psychology, a dynamic tool is reshaping how we cultivate influential leaders – business simulations. Understanding Business Simulations In executive education, business simulations are the pinnacle of immersive learning. Designed to simulate real-world business scenarios, they provide a safe space for leaders to experiment, make mistakes, and reflect on outcomes. What exactly are business simulations, and why are they creating such a stir in the executive suite? A business simulation is a strategic business tool designed to provide a realistic and dynamic environment in which participants can practice and enhance their business acumen, decision-making, and leadership skills without the potential risks and high stakes of the corporate world. The purpose and benefits of business simulations Business simulations help leaders develop skills in critical thinking, decisive action, and team development. The approach to learning through active participation not only deepens understanding but also solidifies skills in a manner unparalleled by traditional lectures or case studies. Experiential learning: Unlike passive learning, business simulations put the participant at the center, driving their learning through hands-on experiences. Adaptive coaching: These simulations offer immediate and detailed feedback, guiding leaders through each decision with tailored advice on performance and strategy. Measurable outcomes: With clear learning objectives and defined metrics, the impact of business simulations on skill development can be tangible and quantifiable. Key elements of effective simulation An interactive ecosystem Business simulations create immersive and dynamic environments that replicate the complexities of the real business world. The participant’s interactions within these environments goes far beyond simple role-play; individuals are stretched to strategize, forecast, and lead in new ways. Scenario-based learning The power of simulation lies in scenarios. Simulations breathe life into abstract concepts, strategies, and theories, by providing context and grounding participants in a tangible relevance that helps meaningful change stick. These simulated scenarios are rooted in your business context, which ensures that the skills learned are directly transferable to leadership roles back at work. Decision making challenges Leadership, is fundamentally about decision making. Business simulations present leaders with carefully crafted decision points, placing a premium on the participant's ability to analyze, synthesize, and decide under pressure. Team collaboration Today's leaders must be more collaborative than ever before. Effective business simulations are designed to improve team dynamics by pushing participants to work together, leverage the strengths of each individual, and synchronize efforts towards a common goal. Each element of the simulation synergizes to create an intricate tapestry of learning that engages, educates, and empowers future leaders. Impact on leadership skills enhancement Communication and interpersonal dexterity In virtual boardrooms and digital work environments, simulation participants must harness their communication skills to lead, negotiate, and inspire team members. The real-time nature of these interactions is a powerful catalyst for skill development in this critical domain. Decision making and problem-solving under duress A hallmark of great leadership is the ability to make sound decisions under the complex conditions of uncertainty and duress. Business simulations offer the perfect laboratory to practice and perfect these high-pressure leadership skills. Strategic acumen and planning Strategy is the lynchpin of leadership. Business simulations are well-designed strategic challenges that push participants to think analytically, envision long-term goals, and chart a course of action, gauging the environment as they advance. Successful implementation strategies Tailoring simulations to organizational culture and goals Not all simulations are created equal, nor should they be. Successful implementation relies on alignment of content and learning objectives. Good simulations take into account the unique culture, challenges, and strategic imperatives of the organization they are designed to support. Continuous improvement through feedback Business simulations are an iterative experience. Participants are more successful when they  share constructive feedback along the way. This ongoing dialogue helps create a culture of continuous learning even outside the simulated environment. Integration with existing development programs A business simulation will have a lasting impact when it complements and integrates with existing leadership development initiatives. This design best practice creates a consistent, coherent, and comprehensive learning experience for all.

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CEO succession: Avoiding the unanticipated Domino Effect

A large financial services company promoted a key leader into the position of CEO. Two of their peers were also vying for the top job. Almost immediately, the other two executives left the company. This created an unexpected leadership vacuum that cascaded within their respective departments, where no one on either team was able to step up into the suddenly vacant leadership spots. The lack of “ready now” successors required the company to look outside to replace those executive leadership roles, significantly disrupting their critical strategic transformation effort and creating additional chaos at the top of the company at a time when they could ill afford to slow momentum. Similarly, a global manufacturing company promoted a key leader into the CEO role who lacked sales and marketing experience – an area where his predecessor had deep expertise. This expertise was a critical driver in the company’s success to date, and the gap at the top was stalling revenue growth and impeding the new CEO’s ability to deliver on the Board’s expectations. In order to fill the CEO’s knowledge gap, the company reorganized the head of sales and marketing role so that it was led by two executives instead of one. This unanticipated restructuring created confusion across the C-Suite and the rest of the sales and marketing organization regarding roles and responsibilities, which compounded their challenges in driving growth. The unexpected increased salary costs accompanying the additional executive role further impacted the bottom line, as well.  What these two examples illustrate is the Domino Effect. The Domino Effect occurs when a star performer is promoted, and there is no “ready now” successor to fill the role they are vacating. With so much attention placed on getting a new CEO into the role, the Domino Effect can cascade down through the organization and is an often hidden and unanticipated outcome that can hinder even the most capable chief executive from successfully taking the reins.  Assessing the impact of the Domino Effect  Conventional wisdom and the literature suggest that CEOs sourced internally outperform CEOs that are sourced externally. For example, in Harvard Business Review’s “Best CEOs of the World” top 100 list, 84% came from internal promotions1. The majority of leaders who ascend to the CEO role are COOs, CFOs, divisional CEOs, and some are “leapfrog” leaders identified below the C-Suite2. A question that has not been addressed is: what happens to the performance of the company when there are no internal candidates for the new CEO’s previous role? In other words, what is the impact of the Domino Effect on company performance?   To answer this question, we compared the S&P 500 twenty best performing companies3 with the twenty worst performing companies4 based upon percentage change in stock price.   What happened at the Best Performing companies?  Within the top 20 best performing companies, 75% of the CEOs were internal with 5 of the CEOs being founders of the company and 10 being promoted into the role. For their former positions, from which they were promoted, four were filled by internal candidates, and two were replaced with external candidates. Examining the leadership teams on the company’s websites, it appears that in three incidences, the role that the CEO vacated no longer exists. In one case the role was restructured and split into two different positions.  What happened at the Worst Performing companies?  70% of the CEOs at the worst performing companies came through promotions or being founder led (12 and 2 respectively), which is nearly identical to the best performing companies. All things being equal, one would expect a similar trend regarding the number of internal vs. external replacements for the CEOs’ previous roles from which they were promoted. However, we found that there were differences. Only three of the backfilled positions were placed by internal candidates and four were placed by external hires. In three of the companies, the position no longer exists, and two of the companies restructured the position.  Understanding the impact: disruption and worsening performance  The research shows little difference between the best and worst performing companies in relation to internal promotions and external hires for the CEO position. However, we do see more organizational disruptions in the replacement of the previous roles held by the CEO. A disruption is defined here as either the company was required to hire from the outside, restructure the role, or eliminate the role altogether. All of these create added turmoil and challenge for the new CEO as they try to move quickly to onboard and start delivering impact.  We found that disruptions were present in 60% of the top-performing companies, compared to 75% of the poorest performing companies. While more research is needed to uncover the nuances, our research suggests that companies with a stronger bench for newly promoted CEOs’ previous positions have less organizational disruption and outperform those who do not have a strong bench.  Tackling the Domino Effect before it falls  While CEO succession garners the greatest amount of the spotlight in the press, among board members, and in public sentiment of the health of a company, our research underscores the need for CEOs, CHROs, and Boards to focus on the Domino Effect as part of their C-Suite succession process. That is, creating a bench of potential successors targeted specifically for the CEO’s previous role, and the roles deeper within the organization that could replace those who are being elevated in the company at the time of the new CEO transition.   Consider these best practices to get ahead of the Domino Effect:  Build the backfill into the identification process. When identifying potential candidates for the CEO, simultaneously consider who may replace that candidate for their current role.  Focus on the role rather than the person. You may not be able to replace the next CEO’s position with one individual, but you may be able to replicate their skills with people who can excel in the role with complimentary skills.  Expand the purview of success profiles. Create success profiles for the CEO and those roles that are likely feeder pools for CEO. Ensure that the success profiles are future focused rather than focused on what is important today. Business realities change over time. What makes someone successful today may be different than what is required in the next 3 to 5 years.  Leverage the power of data for determining future success. As you look at your bench, use structured assessment processes to assess individuals against the success profile, reduce the risk of biases towards individuals, and determine their readiness to address the future business challenges that the organization will face.  Comprehensively build the right bench. Look broad and deep within the organization when identifying potential successors. You may find those “leapfrog” leaders who would otherwise be overlooked.  Continually refresh your succession slate. Given the cascading impacts of the Domino Effect, it is more important than ever to ensure your slate is up to date with viable candidates for higher level positions. Consider doing so on at least an annual basis.  Ensure that succession is seen as a strategic imperative across the leadership of the organization rather than a single event of placing a new CEO. The CEO and the CHRO should own the succession process, the Board should be involved, and the focus should stay equally on the CEO role and the successor leadership roles throughout the organization.  Finding, placing, and ramping up a new CEO is a momentous decision with big outcomes at play – for the CEO’s own success and the viability of the organization. If you embrace the opportunity to turn the Domino Effect into a strategic gameplan, you will be positioned both for accelerated success and impact.  References  1 Harrell, E. Succession Planning: What the Research Says. Harvard Business Review December 2016  2 Harvard Business Review Staff. November 2009. The Best Performing CEOs in the World. Harvard Business Review 41-57.  4 https://www.fool.com/investing/2023/10/10/invest-sp-500-stocks-market-portfolio/  5  https://finance.yahoo.com/news/20-worst-performing-p-500-200036146.html 

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¿La clave para una organización realmente centrada en el cliente? Los datos

La anticipación suele ser fundamental en poder fomentar una cultura centrada en el cliente. Las empresas que utilizan una estrategia client centric a menudo pueden prever cada deseo, necesidad y posible capricho de su público objetivo, y encontrarse generosamente recompensadas en el proceso. Poner al cliente en primer plano, incluso por encima de los ingresos, puede hacer que una empresa sea un 60% más rentable. No es una mala propuesta para cuidar bien uno de los activos más esenciales de una organización. Por supuesto, afirmar ser una empresa centrado en el cliente clientes más fácil decir que ejecutar. Las empresas que lo hacen con éxito a menudo utilizan un método diferente de pensamiento para lograr sus resultados: responden a las preguntas "quién-qué-por qué". Utilizando estas tres preguntas, cada empleado puede entender mejor al cliente más allá de las simples características demográficas. Una comprensión más profunda luego ayuda tomar decisiones informadas, da forma a la experiencia en todos los posibles puntos de contacto y permite una orientación más reflexiva y significativa. Con este método, los empleados hacen que los clientes se sientan vistos y escuchados. Los clientes ven a la empresa en la que eligieron confiar cumpliendo activamente con sus deseos y necesidades. Tales servicios básicos pueden hacer maravillas por la lealtad a la marca y la defensa de la marca. También puede animar a los consumidores a dedicar una parte más grande de sus billeteras, alrededor de un 3% a un 20% más. En una sociedad acelerada, las empresas siempre deben buscar la manera más beneficiosa de apelar a los clientes y retener la lealtad. Una estrategia centrada en el cliente es el primer paso, aunque se necesita una comprensión más profunda de los deseos, necesidades y preferencias de del cliente y comunicarlas para obtener resultados tangibles. Esto plantea la pregunta: ¿Cómo se llega exactamente a una comprensión más profunda de un público objetivo? Entendiendo al público objetivo Las empresas suelen utilizar cuatro métodos específicos para captar hallazgos del consumidor y anticipar mejor los deseos y necesidades de los clientes. El primero es la observación naturalista, que monitorea las interacciones de las personas con el mundo. Estos hallazgos pueden ofrecer ideas sobre cómo un público objetivo podría intentar satisfacer un deseo o necesidad única. El segundo son las encuestas a los clientes que permiten a las organizaciones recopilar comentarios valiosos. El tercero son los grupos focales, que involucran a los clientes discutiendo productos o servicios. Los datos son la cuarta estrategia. A diferencia de los otros, este método es donde las empresas están experimentando actualmente el mayor cambio. La computación en la nube ha llevado a replantear las actividades orientadas a la comprensión del cliente, como la analítica de servicio al cliente, la experiencia de marca, el marketing en redes sociales y las herramientas de voz del cliente. Las nuevas opciones y sistemas pueden abrumar fácilmente a cualquiera que busque los datos correctos para implementar una estrategia enfocada en el cliente. Comenzar con un número limitado de métricas y expandirse desde allí puede ahorrar tiempo, dinero y problemas. Aquí es donde deben dirigir la atención primero: 1. Experiencia de marca Seguir la experiencia de marca puede ayudar a capturar el sentimiento del consumidor sobre su marca. Da una mejor idea de lo que las personas piensan y sienten acerca de sus servicios. Si se hace bien, el seguimiento de la experiencia de marca puede dar luz a las iniciativas de la marca que funcionan o no, lo que permite redirigir los esfuerzos rápidamente. Tanto el puntaje neto de promotores como la satisfacción del cliente pueden ayudar a cristalizar lo que los consumidores podrían estar diciendo y pensando sobre su marca. Las encuestas también pueden ser una gran fuente de información. Mantener las preguntas al mínimo y orientadas para fomentar una participación más completa. Además, asegurarse de no bombardear a los consumidores con cuestionarios. Una buena frecuencia para captar tales sentimientos puede ser trimestralmente. Entender las mentalidades de sus consumidores los anima a confiar en su marca y a seguir volviendo por más. 2. Experiencia del cliente El seguimiento de la experiencia del cliente implica comprender las diferentes dimensiones del deleite del cliente, incluidas las reacciones emocionales y racionales a las ofertas de una empresa. También proporciona información sobre la inclinación del cliente a volver a comprar, recomendar o rechazar un producto o servicio en el futuro. Usando ciertos conjuntos de datos, particularmente aquellos asociados con las interacciones, transacciones y perfiles de los clientes, puede llegar a lo que McKinsey & Company llama "perspectiva predictiva". Esto puede ayudar a dar forma a la experiencia del cliente en el futuro. Todo lo que se necesita son algoritmos de aprendizaje automático para dar sentido a la información y dirigir fondos hacia ciertos puntos de contacto más propensos a impulsar el comportamiento a lo largo del viaje del cliente. 3. Alineación de empleados En una organización centrada en el cliente, cada persona comparte el objetivo de crear una gran experiencia del cliente, desde los ejecutives hasta los asociados de primera línea. El seguimiento y la medición de la alineación de los empleados, o AE, le darán una mejor idea de qué tan bien cada miembro del equipo comprende a los clientes y, lo que es más importante, cree que entender y satisfacer las necesidades del cliente son fundamentales para el éxito de la empresa y el suyo propio. AE comienza con un sentido de camaradería y pertenencia. Una encuesta de Deloitte encontró que el 79% de los empleados tienden a estar de acuerdo. Además, el 93% cree que es un factor que impulsa el rendimiento organizacional. Cuando los empleados pueden ver un objetivo común, es más probable que lo alcancen para el éxito de todos los involucrados. Como con cualquier iniciativa relacionada con el cliente, todo se reduce a los datos. Los pasos más importantes son monitorear el sentimiento del cliente y comprender dónde puede ubicarse su empresa dentro de sus decisiones de compra. Simplemente aprecie que un movimiento incorrecto puede hacer que las personas busquen alternativas a sus servicios. Los clientes quieren lo que quieren cuando lo quieren. Al centrarse en una estrategia comercial centrada en el cliente, puede asegurarse de que lo obtengan y sigan regresando por más  

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Organizaciones adaptativas: el plan de BTS para convertir la flexibilidad organizativa en una ventaja competitiva

La aceleración del cambio y el incremento de la complejidad están definiendo un entorno empresarial en el que resulta difícil triunfar incluso para las organizaciones más expertas. Las empresas actuales luchan constantemente por mantenerse al día en áreas como la sostenibilidad, la preparación para el futuro, o la adaptación a los avances tecnológicos, entre otros desafíos. En la próxima década, el 50% de las empresas del índice S&P 500 serán sustituidas por otras nuevas [1]. Del mismo modo, con respecto a los retos que vienen, el 50 por ciento de los empleados afirma hoy que su organización no está preparada para el futuro [2]. Por si fuera poco, la tecnología digital está trastornando las industrias. Desde 2019, por ejemplo, el gigante tecnológico Apple ha vendido anualmente más relojes que todos los fabricantes de relojes suizos juntos. Si bien la transformación digital es uno de los síntomas más visibles de este entorno en rápida evolución, existe un desafío mayor al que se enfrentan las organizaciones de hoy en día: la aceleración del cambio. En los últimos años, las organizaciones han utilizado diversos términos para describir este fenómeno de cambio continuo y acelerado. Es probable que haya oído menciones a términos como VUCA (del inglés para Volátil, Incierto, Complejo, Ambiguo), BANI (Frágil, Ansioso, No lineal, Incomprensible) o el marco Cynefin (Complejo, Complicado, Caótico y Claro).  

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How to conduct a business simulation: Strategies for driving organizational success through practice

Mastering virtual realities for real-world results Senior executives are increasingly turning to one powerful tool to optimize their decision-making and strategic planning: business simulations. Leaders who are committed to helping their organizations grow into the future understand the potential of this invaluable virtual reality is not just a nice to have, but need to have. In short, simulations change the game when it comes to strategy, alignment, and change. Understanding Business Simulations What is a business simulation? It is a dynamic, iterative model of an organization's business operations, or a part therewithin; simulations leverage technology to mirror complex real-world scenarios designed for learning. Simulations are designed to empower leaders by giving them a low-risk, hands-on learning experiences that bridge the gap between analysis and execution. Purpose and benefits in decision making The core purpose of a business simulation is to simulate a real-life business scenario. Some common examples include scenarios like new market entry, product launch, crisis management, and many similar situations that significantly impacts revenue, talent, growth, and customer satisfaction. Types of simulations Simulations come in many flavors, each suited to a particular business need. At BTS, we offer a variety of simulations that are customized to the support the specific needs of our client organizations. Enterprise simulations Dynamic business simulations are built to immerse your cross-functional teams in real-world customer problems, business trade-offs, and dynamic competition. Strategy simulations The best way to activate your strategy, from the top down, is by creating opportunities for your leaders to pressure test and practice. Workflow simulations Supply chain, engineering product design and manufacturing, sales methodologies and agile sprints are complex processes. Employees need simulation time to understand the bigger picture in these situations. Simulations shed light on cause & effect, key metrics, and the ways in which each individual contributes to the desired outcomes of your strategy. Job simulations Test driving a day in the life deepens understanding of expectations and provides insight into capabilities and development needs to perform at peak. Leadership and cultural simulations Leaders and managers need to practice the pivotal Moments where leaders make or break cultural shifts. Leaders need to build experience in recognizing key moments, identifying what great looks like in those moments, and then practice new behaviors and mindsets to accelerate development. Business unit and function simulations These simulations help illustrates what a high performing function/BU looks and feels like and highlights the pivotal levers and KPI’s required to drive the right business outcomes. Steps to a successful Simulation Business simulations are an art as much as they are a science. Below are the steps you must take to make the most of this tool and meet the needs of your organization. Step 1: Define objectives and scope Always begin with a crystal-clear understanding of what you aim to achieve. Are you testing a new product idea? Assessing the impact of a merger? Preparing for an industry disruption? Defining your why early on will bring focus to your simulation, align the goals of your team, and ensure the simulation directly addresses your key challenges and desired outcomes. Step 2: Select Simulation tools and software Choose your tools wisely! Today's market is replete with sophisticated simulation tools and software. Be it COO models, supply chain management platforms, or market forecasting applications — select the ones that align best with your objectives and are adaptable to the unique contours of your enterprise. Step 3: Gather relevant data Data is the lifeblood of every simulation. Precise, current, and comprehensive data is necessary to construct a realistic model. From financial reports to customer surveys, gather a wide range of internal and external data points to feed the simulation engine. Step 4: Build scenario models Next, design the scenarios you aim to simulate. Develop base case, best case, and worst-case scenarios to cover a spectrum of possibilities and outcomes. Tweak variables, such as pricing or marketing strategies, to observe the ripple effects across your simulated environment. Step 5: Conduct the simulation It’s game day! Assign and assume roles, make decisions, and witness the unfolding of events. This stage requires active participation, strategic thinking, and agility to respond to dynamic conditions that arise within the simulation. Step 6: Analyze results and extract insights When participants have completed the simulation, it's time to sift through data and narratives to understand how their decisions fared. Look for trends, root causes, and areas where your strategy was sound or could benefit from refinement. Step 7: Implement findings into strategy The final step — and often the most critical — is translating insights learned into actionable strategic plans. Whether it's a pivot in your product line, an adjustment to your communication strategy, or a shift in your operational model, use the simulation as a compass to guide your next moves. Big benefits for executives For senior leaders, the impact of a business simulation experience is lasting. Simulations promote continuous learning and push teams constantly iterate, improve, and work together well into the future. The distance between learning and application, in this practical experience, is reduced to a few clicks. Enhancing strategic thinking Simulations require big-picture, enterprise thinking. By engaging in these exercises, senior leaders enhance their strategic prowess and develop the ability to connect disparate dots to make better decisions on behalf of your organization. Fostering team collaboration and alignment Simulations are not just for solitary strategists; they magnify the importance of teamwork and the art of consensus building. They provide a platform for teams to align their vision, collaborate effectively, and intimidate the turbulence of change with prepared unity. The future is now In the relentless sprint toward the future, business simulations stand out as driver of future success. Simulations position leaders to transform every key decision, and every strategic goal, into a story of success and alignment.

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Decoding decision making: Unraveling the complexity of organizational dynamics

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Reimagining relationship banking for small businesses

While small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) play a vital role in driving economic growth and innovation, they often face unique challenges when dealing with banks. This makes relationship banking crucial to their success. By strengthening their relationship banking models, banks can differentiate themselves from competitors by improving the support they provide to SMEs, helping these businesses overcome challenges and thrive in the marketplace.    In discussions with owners of SMEs about their experiences with banks, four common concerns emerge:     Access to credit. Obtaining financing for purposes such as working capital, expansion, or equipment purchase is a significant challenge for SMEs. Banks often perceive them as riskier borrowers due to their limited credit history, lack of collateral, or volatile revenue streams, which can make it difficult to secure loans.  High interest rates and fees. SMEs may face higher interest rates and fees compared to larger, more established businesses due to banks' perception of greater default risk, as well as limited financial transaction volumes.  Complex application processes. SMEs often face time-consuming and complex loan application processes, requiring extensive documentation such as financial statements, tax returns, and business plans.  Inflexible lending terms. SMEs may struggle with inflexible lending terms, including strict collateral requirements, short repayment periods, or covenants that restrict operational flexibility. These terms can make it difficult for SMEs to manage cash flow and invest in growth.  By adopting the following approach, relationship managers can help businesses overcome these challenges:  Advocate for clients within the bank, helping them secure financing for business expansion, capital investments, working capital growth, and asset accumulation.  Offer guidance on optimizing cash resources within the constraint of limited capital resources.  Provide advice on managing personal wealth accumulated through business ownership.  This approach requires a set of knowledge and capabilities:  Business acumen—an understanding of SMEs’ unique needs and business challenges.  Recognition of the essential role cash flow plays in small business success and an understanding of how to optimize it.  Familiarity with the financial impact of bank products on SMEs' finances.  Understanding of small business funding models, including the roles of owners, banks, and investors.  Insight into the migration of SMEs to medium-sized enterprises.  Equipped with these capabilities and this knowledge, bankers can employ critical relationship management skills at four key stages:  Planning. Gain local market knowledge and industry/sector expertise before engaging with clients.  Discovery. Approach SMEs with a focus on their unique needs, recognizing the distinct characteristics of owner-managed and owner-financed businesses.  Engagement. Position offerings from a client-impact perspective, rather than a bank- product perspective, addressing the specific needs and challenges of SMEs.  Closing. Adopt a partnering approach and act as an advocate for SME clients within the bank, particularly when dealing with credit functions and decision-makers.  By focusing on these areas, banks can enhance their relationship banking model for SME customers, providing personalized support and tailored financial solutions to help small businesses succeed in a competitive landscape. 

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What’s the future for retail banking? Hint: it’s digital and brick and mortar 

In today's rapidly evolving consumer landscape, marked by disruptive innovations and increasing competition, retail banks are facing a pivotal moment. Digital banking is here to stay – but shockingly, so too is its predecessor – branch banking. The traditional role of the branch is evolving, however, and leaders in the industry need to stay relevant in this dynamic environment by embracing key changes.  Why are branches alive and well in the digital age?  Despite the proliferation of digital channels, brick and mortar branches continue to play a vital role in retail banking. Research shows that while routine transactions are moving online, branches still remain critical to:  Customer acquisition and retention: Branches remain the primary channel for opening new accounts and acquiring customers, particularly high-value segments.  Personalized advice and sales: Complex and high-value products such as mortgages, loans, and investments require personalized interactions. Branches excel at providing tailored advice and converting sales opportunities.  Trust and loyalty: Human interactions are essential to building trust and loyalty, especially when addressing financial concerns and needs.  The future of branch-level sales management  To stay competitive and relevant, sales leaders in retail banking must pivot from traditional methodologies and adopt a future-forward approach. This means:  1. Adapting to customer preferences: Sales leaders must understand and respond to changing customer behavior and preferences, thus offering a customer experience that seamlessly integrates digital and physical channels. 2. Leveraging data and analytics: Sales leaders must be able to harness the power of data to gain insights into customer behavior, preferences, and needs. This enables leaders to take a targeted and personalized approach to engaging customers.  3. Empowering sales teams: Sales leaders need to invest in the development of their sales teams, enhancing their skills and knowledge and equipping them with the right tools to deliver exceptional customer experiences.  4. Optimizing branch functionality: Sales leaders must rethink the branch model, focusing on smaller, more versatile formats that cater to specific customer needs all within the same branch footprint.  5. Innovation and collaboration: Sales leaders must foster a culture of innovation and collaboration, encouraging their teams to experiment, learn, and share best practices. Organizations should consider collaborating with fintech companies to take advantage of emerging technologies and deliver innovative solutions that better meet customer’s needs.  A call to action  Digital banking may be the future, but branch baking is here to stay. Sales leaders in retail banking who want to thrive in the future need to embrace this transformation, the integration of old and new, and reimagine how they manage their customer experience and how they meet customer needs. By adopting a forward-thinking approach, leveraging technology, and nurturing talent, retail banks can unlock new opportunities, drive growth, and stay relevant amid increased competition. Are you ready to take on the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead? 

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